The First Step is Always the Hardest

It’s hard to just get started.

It’s hard sometimes to wake myself up in the morning to work out despite the fact that I told myself I will and that I even set the alarm to make sure.  And when the alarm sounds, I find myself questioning whether to really go through with it. 

I find excuses.  My back aches.  It’s cloudy and might rain.  It’s too cold.  It’s maybe better to use the time to work on my business report.  Etcetera.  Etcetera. 

But once I realise that I’d lose that precious time slot I invested for my morning exercise, I decide (sometimes with difficulty) to get up, suit up, and do my workout. 

Once I’ve lifted that barbell and start to break a sweat, I find myself feeling good that I had decided to push through with the morning exercise. 

It happens a lot of time to us.  Just getting started is always the hardest part.  But once we’re into it, there is momentum.  It becomes easier to finish a job as we get deeper into it. 

A journey of a thousand miles indeed begins with the first step.  And the first step is always the hardest.  Whether it be a simple job or a long trip, we find it often hard just to get started.

This is because a journey’s first step isn’t really that one foot out the door.  A first step begins with writing a plan, packing that suitcase, or in my example of my morning work-out, getting out of bed. 

For several years, my relatives have talked about travelling to Spain and taking that long hike to the Santiago de Compostela

The Santiago de Compostela is a cathedral located in the city named after it.  It is the reputed burial site of St. James, one of the Twelve (12) Apostles of Jesus Christ.  The Santiago de Compostela has been a famous destination for Catholic pilgrims and tourists especially those who took the Camino de Santiago, the Way of St. James, a network of walking trails that lead to the cathedral. 

Many who have taken the walking route found it very much worth it.  Plenty of scenery. Fresh air.  Good exercise.  Staying overnight at inns and sampling the local Spanish Galician cuisine.  And finally seeing that majestic cathedral at the end of the trail.  The awesome baroque cathedral that takes away the breath of many who see it the first time. 

A pilgrim along the norther route of the Camino de Santiago
The Cathedral of Santiago de Composela

The traditional route favoured by die-hard travellers is the French Way which goes as far as 800 kilometres and would take several days even for the fastest walkers.  Tourists usually opt for the much shorter routes although in order to secure a certificate of pilgrimage, one has to at least walk a hundred (100) kilometres. 

But as I and relatives have talked about taking the trip.  It so far has been just that: talk.  We haven’t taken any first step, which isn’t that first footstep on the trail but just getting to making an itinerary, booking a flight, or deciding which of the walking journeys to take.

Whether it be a daily morning work-out, an 800-kilometre hike like the Camino de Santiago, or a job we have to do at work or at home, we don’t get anywhere unless we make that first step.  It’s not deciding that we’ll do it.  It’s not telling ourselves we will do it.  And it isn’t that first footstep or that first lift of a barbell.  It’s the execution, the act itself that matters. 

It’s getting out of bed, booking that reservation, making that phone call, and finally getting to work that constitute those very first steps to whatever we intend to do. 

It’s hard to get started.  But we won’t regret it when we do. 

About Overtimers Anonymous

Being Proactive Requires Reviewing Our Values

My boss asked me to finish a report by Monday morning.  I was planning to submit it by Wednesday next week but my boss wanted it earlier.  Because he asked me on Friday, I had to cancel my weekend plans. 

Some bosses pile on work on their employees.  The bosses would believe there is good reason but they also would believe they aren’t beholden to explain deadlines to their subordinates.  Bosses dictate, employees follow, after all. 

Employees, however, are people too and it can be demoralising when the boss deems work more important than the quality time of employees after work hours. 

So, what can employees do? 

Either the employees just do what the bosses say or they don’t.  If they do, they can count on some praising like a pat-on-the-back assuming they did a good job.  If they don’t, they’ll risk getting on the bad side of the boss who would put a bad mark on an employee’s performance record which may lead to career stagnation. 

Not really much of a choice.  But that’s reality. 

Never mind what some consultants or so-called gurus may say, people who work for other people don’t own their time.   When we have bosses, the bosses own us and sometimes if not often, they own even our time after work hours.

This is because work for many people, like middle managers and office workers, as we know it no longer is limited to a fixed schedule.  With email, SMS texting, and Internet-enabled voice & chat technologies, the boss can communicate with her employees wherever they may be and at anytime.  (I had a boss who’d call me when I was halfway around the world on vacation and that was even before the Internet). 

But thanks also to the Internet, we have more access to more information.  We can find out if there are other jobs waiting for us in other companies.  We can submit our curricula vitae (CV) with a few clicks of a mouse.  And we can get interviewed long distances from the comforts of our own home (or office desk when the boss isn’t around). 

The hard part, of course, is writing the CV and preparing for the interview.  The harder part is deciding whether we’d want to change careers in the first place. 

The hardest part, however, is making the choice itself.  We’d wrack our brains thinking if we should stay in our jobs or move on to greener pastures. 

It isn’t just about the risks of what we choose but it’s also what we believe in. 

This is what being proactive is really about.  Proactive is choosing based on what we value.  Note it isn’t what we want, it is what we value.  Stephen Covey of Seven (7) Habits fame identifies being proactive as the freedom to choose one’s response.  But to choose what we believe is right, we should choose based on what’s important for us, which is in a nutshell are our values

Employees would opt to stick with a job with a slave-driver boss that deprives weekends off because the employees would value the job security and income needed for their families. 

An employee, however, may choose to quit because she values her time with her children more than anything else. 

But as much as it may be clear to some, it can be a lengthy exercise for many who haven’t really defined what they value or are in self-conflict with changes in what are important to them. 

As the PlanPlus Online website puts it, values “may change as demands or needs change.” 

“If a given belief or opinion is something that might be altered if the conditions are right, then it’s a value.”

-PlanPlus Online, The Difference Between Principles and Values, https://www.planplusonline.com/difference-principles-values/

When values become moving targets, we can become confused and that can make it difficult to decide things.  We therefore sometimes become dependent on others to make our minds up, like just doing what the boss tells us to do. 

Values are based on beliefs, opinions, causes, and/or the very stuff we put the highest importance on, such as our families, relationships, careers, and religions.  We often try to rank them and doing so can be a difficult process, not to mention frustrating.  The bottom line is we always are evaluating what our priorities are. 

Is there a best way to define our values?  No.  But the question maybe should be:  how often should we define our values?  Not everybody knows what he or she wants.  Lucky for those who do but there are many who constantly need to review what’s important.  Actually, it may be those who do it often are the luckier ones because they would always be updated to their versions of their value systems. 

When we know surely what we think or feel what’s important, we’d know how to choose confidently.  We end up knowing how to answer when a boss asks us to work on weekends. 

About Overtimers Anonymous

Six (6) Reasons Why We Need to Learn How to Manage Supply Chains

Why do we need to learn how to manage supply chains?

The answer to the question may seem straightforward at first.   

We need to learn how to manage supply chains so that we can ensure the availability of products and services at the right quantity, right quality, at the time they’re needed, and at a cost that is within stakeholders’ expectations.

But it’s not really that straightforward. 

Supply Chain Management was the idea of Mr. Keith Oliver who sometime in the 1970’s, while working for consultancy firm, Booz Allen Hamilton, developed a vision to break down the functional silos within organisations and integrate operations toward the common purpose of meeting customer requirements. 

Keith Oliver proposed I2M or Integrated Inventory Management in a presentation to a steering committee at the multinational corporation, Philips, in the 1970’s.  But as Oliver struggled to define I2M as the “management of a chain of supply as though it were a single activity,” one of the Philips managers, Mr. Van t’Hoff, suggested Oliver to call it just that:  “total supply chain management.” 

Not many of us really remember Keith Oliver or Mr. Van t’Hoff that much these days but most of us know, or at least heard of, supply chains and supply chain management

Supply Chain Management is a subject that has gained much attention and interest since Messrs Oliver and Vant’Hoff uttered the term.  Just about every enterprise that sells a product recognises the importance of supply chains especially when it comes to deliveries and costs. 

I learned supply chain management mostly on my own, in which I was fortunate to experience different assignments representing various stages of supply chain operations.

I managed inbound receipts of raw materials in which I learned how to plan, schedule, store, and handle incoming receipts.  I learned to be careful in making sure there neither was too much inventory nor too little. 

I managed production operations in which I learned that management is mostly how one works with not only people who are on the factory floor but also with peers from other departments, like purchasing, shipping & transportation, engineering & maintenance, human resources (HR), finance & accounting, and research & development (R&D).

I managed outbound logistics in which I learned that customer service starts not with deliveries but with understanding what customers want. 

From these experiences, I’ve distilled six (6) reasons why we need to learn how to manage supply chains. 

  1. Supply chains are the life-blood of (just about) every enterprise

All enterprises that sell products and services rely on some sort of supply chain for the transformation and flow of resources and merchandise.  The operations that underlie them provide the revenues and dictate the costs which determine the wealth and health of enterprises. 

  • Supply chains go beyond the enterprise’s borders

Supply chains don’t describe what happens within enterprises.  They describe what happens between enterprises.  Managers who are adept about their operations are only at most half-way in managing supply chains.  The real good ones are those who can make the entire supply chain work favourably for their enterprise’s interests. 

  • They’re complicated

No two (2) supply chains are alike, whether one compares enterprises or the operations that run through them.  And every supply chain isn’t really just a single flow of stuff from one end to another.  They’re really interconnected links where items flow in and flow out at various points of every other enterprise’s operation; some of which are visible and some of which are sometimes not. 

  • They’re prone to adversity

Every chain has its weakest links and the more links they are, the more likely they are vulnerable to adversity.  Adversities come in all types of risks and degrees of disruption.  Some are natural; some are man-made.  And they are often unpredictable, which requires some special talent in mitigating, if not avoiding them. 

  • Supply chain success relies on the performance of people

Much emphasis has been made on managing resources when it comes to supply chains.  But supply chain success can only happen with how well people working in them perform.  A lot rides on the workers and operators at different points of the chain and that doesn’t discount stakeholders such as the vendors, customers, information technology professionals, engineers, technicians, executives, and supervisors. 

  • They’re changing

Supply chains are evolving.  And not necessarily uniformly.  Some have hardly changed, such as storage & handling at seaports.  Some have dramatically altered the landscape such as e-commerce portals displacing middlemen in the retail industry.  And not only are they evolving within industries.  Supply chains are coming into play in enterprises one would never think they’d be applicable.  These include business process outsourcing (e.g. call centres), labour contract agencies, insurance, and software development. 

Supply chain management was born from the “aha” moment of Messrs. Keith Oliver and Van t’Hoff.  While the names of both esteemed men have waned from our memories, their brainchild, supply chain management, has become a very popular subject of discussion at enterprises the world over. 

But popularity alone is not enough a reason for why we need to learn how to manage supply chains. 

Supply chain management has become more important as enterprises recognise that it is the manifestation of actual revenue and cost, that it goes beyond borders of businesses, that it addresses complexity and adversity, that people performance is key to success, and that it is changing, not necessarily smoothly but more often in fits and starts. 

I am lucky to have experienced working in various supply chain operations but what it gave me wasn’t credentials but rather, the insights in how supply chains deserve a high place in our management priorities. 

About Overtimers Anonymous